#TMMArtistInterviews

Calamity Fair May 14 2018, 0 Comments

Pretty stoked to introduce our next artist that we met through our homie Tom that runs @ArtForTheSick. Before getting too deep into all the details let’s let this amazing artist John Vochatzer have his say in the following interview - enjoy!


Mural Work by @CalamityFair

TMM:
So John, where are you from, and where do you reside now?

JV:
I was born in Coos Bay, Oregon but spent most of my growing up in Stockton, California and the surrounding central Valley. Now I've been living in San Francisco for almost 15 years.

TMM:
Surfing the inter-webs we were able to check out some of your illustrations, murals, and of course your amazing collage work.
Are there any other mediums that you experiment with as well?

JV:
Thank you! Yeah those are pretty much my main gigs lately but I've dabbled in a little bit of everything. I did a lot of oil painting when I was younger but gradually fell out of that. Then I had a brief stint in film school, and although I quite quickly realized it wasn't an industry for me, film was and still is a big inspiration. Throughout my twenties I played in a few goofy punk bands and made a lot nonsense zines and unsigned practical-joke style street art. I didn't really take myself or anything seriously for that matter and creativity during this period was really just a vehicle for my own self amusement and making my friends and myself laugh. I've definitely grown out of that mentality since. I also write poems and like to cook.


Collage On Wood by @CalamityFair

TMM:
So John, we learned about your work via @artforthesick by first seeing your collage art.

Can you explain your process in which you create your collages? Are there particular types of magazines, books, or other mediums that you typically source materials and inspiration from?

JV:
Yeah @artforthesick! My friend and next door neighbor Tom runs that page. He's a weirdo, I think he's from Guam or something.

Yeah, about 98.5% of my material comes from used books and magazines I find at thrift stores, book sales, ebay, and this really cool store in the SF Tenderloin called "The Magazine" that has a bunch old photos and used magazines for like 35 cents a pop. Recently, as in the past six months or so, I've started scanning images and resizing and reproducing them. I found that sometimes I would be buying the same book over and over because it had so many usable images in it that eventually I decided I needed to find a more economic route. Now I'm hooked on reprinting and all the possibilities that come with being able to mass produce and layer the same image repeatedly. I also have a very meticulous way of organizing and categorizing the things I cut out. Everything gets put into boxes and albums each designated for it's specific type: limbs, tails, fish, eyes, teeth, snakes, wings, etc.


Tongue And Cheek Art Work by @CalamityFair.

TMM:
So John, can you talk a bit about your childhood and how any of the elements from where you grew up may have influenced the work you do today?

JV:
During the nineties when I was a kid, #Stockton was your pretty standard Californian city and as I remember it it wasn't at all a bad city to spend a childhood, during that time at least. That being said I did have periods of what I could only describe as a frenetic growing up that I think really led me to developing my imaginative side. I remember heavily obsessing over comics, trading cards, action figures, cartoons and maybe never even really understanding or paying attention to the stories and narratives that came attached with them, instead always fabricating and making up my own. I think my art as an adult still does this in a way, but now instead with things like #religiousiconography, #naturalhistory, #anthropology, #anatomy, #classicalart... the world via printed media has provided me with these #archetypes and with a foundation to disassemble and rearrange into my own #alternativeworld.

TMM:
That’s fascinating and magnificent how the these elements of your childhood can somehow show up in your work now.

So who were some influential artists for you growing up?


Wheat-Paste Collage by @CalamityFair

JV:
From the time I was a teenager all the way into my early twenties the surrealists were my idols. #MaxErnst, #YvesTanguy, #Magritte, and especially #Dalí. When I was a broke 17 year old I would go steal every book I could about them from the corporate book chains in Stockton and needed to gather every existing image and piece of printed information I could about these wondrous and mysterious people. I spent a good year obsessing over Antonin Artaud alone. I soon later went on to discover the lesser publicized women #surrealists like #RemediosVaro and #LeonoraCarrington who I found out were just as if not even more incredible #painters and also bad-ass #anarchists.

TMM:
John, where do you typically create your work?

JV:
Everywhere I go haha. I manage an apartment building and have a small office that I've used on-and-off as a workspace and my friend and fellow artist #MaxEhrman also has a studio in the building which he lets me use at night if I need to do anything with #spraypaint or #resin or other noxious chemicals but in all honesty the majority of my creative work gets done on my apartment floor. The type of work I do requires having a wide range of materials and supplies at my fingertips and until they day I can afford a large, spacious studio space to myself I've realized it's most practical just to keep everything together in a single place and that so happens to be the same place I sleep. I overall don't mind it except for I'm always having to step around piles of #razorblades and mounds of #paper and what have you.



Wheat-Paste by @CalamityFair

TMM:
Can you talk about some of the wheat-paste work you put out in the street?

JV:
Yeah wheatpasting is something I've always on-and-off done throughout my life. For the most part though it's usually been more lowkey like plastering up show flyers for my band or doing ballpoint drawings while bored at my job and then going and blowing them up at Kinkos afterwards and gluing them around my neighborhood. Only recently have I started to integrate the street art with my actual collage work. Not only did I just feel like my collages were at a good stage that they'd apply well to outdoor street art, but I've felt like San Francisco now more than ever, as I watch it increasingly become more corporate and mundane, needs more weird, outlandish shit out-and-about to keep things interesting and alive. In the past year I've also spent time in Buenos Aires and Barcelona doing paste-ups and am hoping to get out to a lot more cities in the near future.
TMM:
So John are you involved with your art full-time? If not, how are you currently able to balance the work you do creatively?

JV:
I'm definitely not unacquainted with the side gigs and occasional odd jobs haha! Creative liberty is something that is very important to me and consequently I turn down the majority of commission and design work I get asked to do. I almost always regret accepting it and it distracts me from the projects I'd rather be working on. On the other side of that I end up missing out on lot of money because although the fine art sales can be great at times, I'm sure as a lot of artists know, they aren't consistent. Fortunately when I need to I manage to find work that gives me space to breath and be creative and a lot of downtime to do what I want to do.

Eye Full Flower by @CalamityFair

TMM:
What are some of your goals creatively with the work you are creating?

JV:
My biggest goals are just to keep my imagination stimulated and to keep bringing my inner world into the outer world just with more and more precision, abundance, and detail. I also work in so many different styles and mediums that one of my current goals is focusing on bridging a lot of the gaps therein. Sometimes I look back on my work over the past few years and think to myself "holy shit, this looks like it could be the work of five different people." And while I think that definitely has it's merits, I'm really trying to develop all of my facets to a point in which they more fluidly work together. 

TMM:
John, what advice would you give other aspiring artists interested in pursing their dreams of being an artist that you have learned in your own experience?

JV:
Everybody's path to doing what they want to do is different. If there's one piece of advice I'd give though its don't worry about what other people are going to think or say of you. I think a lot of people hold back from their dreams because of lack of confidence and fear of judgement. I myself was really apprehensive about creating for a good period because I kept thinking in my mind that what I was doing was too weird and people would misunderstand it or think that it was just some kind of freak druggy art. I let that go and I let my imagination run wild, feral, and free now and I've grown a lot more and come a lot further because of it.


Beauty In The Flower Eye Of The Beholder by @CalamityFair.

TMM:
If there were any creator that you could collaborate with living or dead who would it be and why?

JV:
This is a bit of a tough question. What I like most about collaborative art is the element of play and surprise so I suppose I'd want to collaborate with someone who'd cater to that. Alejandro Jodorowsky comes to mind but he's such a one-man visionary dynamo I don't even know how that'd work. Maybe Marcel Duchamp? I don't know. 

TMM:
Can you talk about the current print project that you are working on currently?


A Feral Bouquet by @CalamityFair available here.

JV:
Absolutely. I'm doing a pre-order limited edition print release of three of my more recent mixed media collages starting on May 14th this month. The release will be in collaboration with my friend Mike @strange_cessation who does all of my fine art and street art printing and the goal is basically just to help fund my street art and afford to do bigger and better things and in more cities. I'm hooked on full color imagery and as you can imagine the tab on that runs up pretty quickly. Hopefully it goes well and I can keep doing what I like to do and bring big colorful creatures to life out on the streets!

El Obsceno Pájaro De La Noche by @CalamityFair
Print available here.


TMM:
John, how did you get the IG handle @CalamityFair?

JV:
Calamity Fair was actually the name of a zine I was working on in like 2011 or 2012 that I never quite finished. Somehow I had come up on this gigantic stack of Vanity Fair magazines and my idea was to remix them into this surrealist, dissociative zine called Calamity Fair. I opened my instagram account shortly after with the idea of it being a good platform for posting pictures of the zine as I made it, which I kinda did/kinda didn't do and eventually as that idea faded out the name stuck and it's inadvertently become my artist alias. Now I find myself constantly being referred to as Calamity Fair or just Calamity, and although it was never my initial intent I don't really mind it. It fits.

TMM:
Ok now the fun stuff; tell us a joke.

JV:
No thanks, I've just already spent enough time talking about my life.


Wheat-Paste by @CalamityFair

TMM:
Ask us any question.

JV:
Whats your social security number?
TMM:
222-22-2222 - we got an answering machine that can talk to you. Btw that was the best question any artist has ever asked us! Be sure to follow John Vochatzer on IG: @CalamityFair

If you are interested in future projects that The Method Makers and John will be working on together, be sure to sign up for our mailing list or following The Method Makers on IG.

Peace!
The Method Makers

MADDY! April 15 2018, 0 Comments


(Elemental by
@madeleinetonzi)

We have been inspired by Maddy’s work for a few years now and have even requested a special wall commission by her (stay tuned for future detail of this project.)

Her work gives us a scenic sense of ease, and at times we feel the there is an element of nature, positive energy, and even a hint of spirituality.

Please enjoy getting to know more about Maddy and her work as much as we did.

TMM:
Maddy! We are super stoked - thanks for taking the time the time to connect with us!

We've admired your work for a few years now, and we’ve been curious - as an artist from Santa Fe, and now living in the Bay Area are there elements in your work that stem from the environment back home in New Mexico, and similarly in the Bay Area?


MT:
Absolutely and all the way through. I am internally very connected to New Mexico, and as much as I may try to steer my art in other directions, elements of home always channel through to the surface in which I work on. Whether it’s through color or form, and especially the night sky, the desert always seems to inspire my imagery.

Likewise, having lived in California for fifteen years now, I find that specific plants and sometimes architecture are integrated into my work as well, which is why I often use palms and succulents and broken branches in my work.


(Desert Doll House by @madeleinetonzi)

TMM:
Are there any elements taken from your childhood growing up in NM that you feel have influenced the work you do now?

MT:
When I am thinking about a concept, often my ideas arrive out of a strong feeling of nostalgia. I reflect on the experiences when I felt most free as a child, or the special places in which my friends and I created together as the wild desert kids that we were.

One painting in particular titled, ‘Desert Doll House, ’ was specifically about that. My oldest friend, whom I have know since we were three years old, lived out in what we called “the country.” Now it seems as though the town’s edges have arrived closer and a freeway bustles close to the land in which her house sat. But back then, we were smaller and the world was so much bigger.

Her mother was an artist and created a doll house for her. It was open aired and had three levels with a bath tub on the top. Every part was made from hand and it was so magical.

That's what being a kid felt like out there. That entire piece of land and the freedom we had as kids to explore the arroyos, dig in the dirt, get cactus stuck in our hands and feet, and play in the forts we nestled between piñon trees was some of the best times.

TMM:
That sounds so mystical ✨✨✨



(Reconstruction by
@madeleinetonzi)

TMM:
Maddy we’ve always been fascinated with the childhood of the creators we interview and how growing up may influence the art they create.

Can you tell us about a fun childhood memory?


MT:
One of the times I spent the night my oldest friend’s house, and we decided to sleep in a tent outside. There was no fence around us, just open land spotted with chamisa, cholla and piñon trees. Her mom packed us a cooler with milk and cereal for the morning and we set out to spend a night in the wild.

We were only ten feet from the house but it felt like we were in the middle of nowhere. However, it didn’t take long before we were scared out of our wits, out of the tent and sent running back into the house when something came hurling against the walls of the tent. As fast as it arrived it was gone and so were we, terrified of what kind of desert spirit was out to haunt us.

It must have been pretty funny from her parents perspective, hearing two little girls and her brother scream all the way to the front door. I’m still not sure what it was. Maybe a jack rabbit or a coyote, or perhaps just the wind. Or maybe it was La Llorona...

TMM:

Yikes! 👀👀


(Portal On Salt Flats by @MadeleineTonzi)

TMM:
Baby Jessie is our Little Moon. We love how you’ve been taking pics of this beautiful black #sphere with #cosmic dust upon it in some of your posts over the past few years.

We also noticed that the image shows up in your work. What is the significance of the object, and reason behind its incorporation into the work you do?

MT:
Thank you! The #PortablePortal is a newer project. At some point portals became a frequent theme within my work, and I wanted to make a piece that could travel with me and help contextualize my work, but also provide me with new inspiration. Getting out and exploring is very important to my process and the portal provides a challenge within every adventure. It also allows me to explore photography as well.

Symbolically, the portal illustrates time and movement through space. It is a window into the various places in which I inhabit throughout my travels. I like to position the portal within environments that resonate with me on a personal level as well as an energetic and aesthetic level too. Over time, the portal starts to act as the thread that connects me to each place I have been.

TMM:
Epic
.


(Focil by @MadeleineTonzi)

TMM:
So Maddy how did the migration from #NM to the #BayArea take place?
Were there any creative reasons for doing so?

MT:
I moved to #California in 2003 after I graduated high school with the intent on studying art. I didn’t follow the path of most people in that I wasn’t interested in a four year college just yet. I wanted to explore and try new things.

I landed in #SantaBarbara for the first four years I was out here. I attended community college where I studied studio art and then eventually transferred to #CaliforniaCollegeOfTheArts where I obtained my BFA. But those first four years were the best. The art department at #SBCC is incredibly beautiful and state of the art. It was a very nurturing an supportive community. I worked three jobs at times to get by, but tuition was free and I feel very lucky to have gone to school in a place that overlooked the ocean.


TMM:
So Maddy, who are some of your creative influences previously and today?

MT:

There is an artist name Christine Gray who I discovered at her MFA show in Santa Barbara some years back. She creates surreal landscapes rich in color and dream like imagery. Stephanie Dotson, a multi media print maker and painter, is really fantastic as well. I love her use of texture and pattern, combined with encaustic and three dimensional elements within her work.

Aside from that, I am inspired by my contemporaries daily. I have a lot of artist friends who are all making it through this world in a different way, and that to me is very inspiring.



(The Arctic Jungle by @MadeleineTonzi - Print available for purchase)

TMM:
Maddy, your work makes us feel very at ease, and at times we feel the there is an element of nature, positive energy, even a sense of spirituality there.

Is there any message, question, or inspiration your work is trying to convey?

MT:
The most spiritual moments I have had always take place in nature. I am not religious but if I had to claim a church it would be the wild outdoors. I am deeply inspired by the natural world and my art is heavily influenced by those moments in which you can hardly find words to describe when you experience something so magical your skin tingles. Growing up in the Southwest definitely has that affect on people. In New Mexico, everything you experience is of the earth. Our roads are still dirt, and the earth comes right up to your doorstep. The building are designed to blend into the landscape, and you feel very much a part of your environment.

The imagery I create is often about capturing the feeling of a moment. The stillness, the lighting, the magic of the surrounding plants. I remember so vividly an underground party I went to in the mountains behind Santa Barbara. The ambient music was echoing through the hills, and I had hiked out a bit to escape for a minute. I found myself perched above the landscape. The moon was full and a silver blue glow softened the rolling mountains, and the stars twinkled in the sky. It was really magical.



(Hallway Installation by @MadeleineTonzi)

TMM:

Maddy, you recently did an amazing project with @meow__wolf. Can you explain how that came about and share with us details of what was produced from it?

MT:
#MeowWolf reached out to me last October and asked for me to participate in their annual upgrades. I have admired them for some time and I couldn’t turn down the opportunity to create a proposal.

Working in that environment was so inspiring and freeing in so many ways. Being inside Meow Wolf is like being inside a waking dream. So many pieces of it reminiscent of something I have experienced in life before, and yet it is full of mystery and surprises.

I am super grateful for the experience and I hope to collaborate more with them in the future. And I highly recommend a visit there to anyone.


(Untitled by @MadeleineTonzi from the curators personal collection)

TMM:
What projects are you working on currently and what else do you have planned for the remainder of the year?

MT:
I am currently gearing up for a show at #FleetWoodSF, and after that I’ll be working on something special for #Kaaboo #DelMar, a mural and music festival in #SanDiego, taking place in September. In between those projects I will be working on a new body of work, and planning a print release as well.

TMM:
In regards to music, what's on heavy rotation in your studio while you are creating for these projects?

I listen a lot to #CocoRosie while I am making art. They spent some time growing up in New Mexico, and their sound aesthetic really feeds into my creative process. Likewise, I listen to #FeverRay and #Grimes a lot while creating. I am really into ambient sounds and experimental electronic music as well.



(The Strawberry Moon by @MadeleineTonzi - Print available for purchase)

TMM:
Ok now for the good stuff - tell us a joke.

MT:
Oh my! I’m really bad at jokes, but hmmm.
Let’s see. What did the Koala say at his job interview?

TMM:
Haha - what did he say?

MT:

I am very koala-fied for this position! Ha!.

TMM:
Hahaha awesome! Ok now is there any question you would like to ask us?

MT:
Where do you think the art world is headed in terms of galleries verses the online world?


(The Arches and Canyons
by @MadeleineTonzi - Original available for purchase)

TMM:
Ooh good question. We feel that although much of what art is accessible is now available online to view by social media, and other virtual experiences, there will always be a need for the physical way we experience art (in galleries, museums, etc.) This in the form of installations, murals, sculptures, urban exploration - to us the virtual experience is just one gateway to experience the work. But the physical experience will always be necessary.

Ok so Maddy, if there were an artist (dead or alive) you would love to do some collaborative project with who would it be and what project would you envision creating with them?

MT:
I would love to sit in #GeorgiaOkeeffe ‘s house with her, take a walk with her in the back country of #Abiquiú and talk about the landscape. And maybe make a painting beside her too. When I look at her paintings I can imagine how good it must have felt to work the paint as she did.

If I could collaborate with anyone right now, I think it would be the team of #MeowWolf. It is so exciting to see how everyone’s individual skill sets are put together to make an idea into reality, and I would love to be a part of a more dynamic installations that combines tech, sounds, and visual art all in one.

---

Much love & blessings to Maddy for connecting with us! & answer all of our questions!

You can learn more about Maddy's work by visiting her
site and her shop where you can buy prints & original works. Be sure to follow her on IG @MadeleineTonzi.

If you are interested in future projects that The Method Makers and Maddy collaborate on in the future, be sure to
sign up for our mailing list or following Method Makers on IG.

Peace!
-TMM


Big Friday - Aka Will Coyner April 06 2018, 0 Comments

We have the best jobs in the world. Connecting with artists that peak our creative interests, learning more about their creativity, and telling you all about it.

We had this revelation that we’re sort of like the David Lettermen & women of #LowBrowCulture (self proclaimed of course - with as little ego as possible).

That said, since we began the #TMMartistInterviews project we’ve had a lot of our good friends & folks within our network introduce us to creatives that they feel deserve the chance to shine brightly before you here and on our IG and Fanpage.

We met Will through another mutual Designer homie Mike Mariano - shout out to @cmmariano for the humbling intro! We had connected at the baptism for baby G @chevyandgrace @guiltybyassociation @the_design_concierge regarding Lucasfilm artists and the possibility of showcasing the work of these talented designers and here we are now telling you about them!

Let’s begin...


(Self Portrait by @big_friday)

TMM:
Will, we were so stoked to have Mike link us to your work. Going through your site and IG and some of the work we’ve seen on the web, we were curious to know more about your background and how that may have somehow influenced your work.

Can you tell us where abouts you are from, and also something interesting about your childhood and where you grew up?

WC:
Certainly, I’m from Waynesboro, Virginia; a small country town nestled in the Shenandoah Valley, next to the Blue Ridge Mountains.

I grew up on a farm, for which I am eternally grateful. I got to play outside in the dirt, daydream for hours and read comics with no distractions.

TMM:
Man that sounds amazing & peaceful.

Can you talk about your earliest memory with regards to creating and how your style may have transitioned over time? By the way how long have you been illustrating and involved with your art?


(GGE by @big_friday)

WC:
Well like most, I imagine, I have been “doing” art since childhood, copying comics and drawing whatever caught my eye. But the first piece I remember being asked to create was a full-scale replica of the Virginia state flag for a member of the family church when I was 15, I think. He did Civil War reenactments and it was for his regiment.

It was my first paying gig, 50 bucks. It took me like a year to complete because I immediately realized I had little interest in doing commissioned art I had no interest in.

In terms of illustrating as an adult, I’ve done everything from pin striping and airbrushing, to logo and t-shirt design, to marketing and concept art for games. I have been working full-time in the game industry since 2012.


(Bros by @big_friday)

As far as style, I really like line drawings with vivid color like comics, or dramatically lit, moody character paintings. I typically go between these two styles in regards to personal work, and it tends to satisfy my visual creative needs. The biggest change over the years has been going from tangible paintings and drawings to digital versions. The process tends to stay the same, though I tend to have less of a plan going into a digital piece as I can iterate and design on the fly, something that is useful for production but often detrimental when returning to physical pieces.

TMM:
So Will, what is your typical process when you create work?

WC:
Ideally, I start with as much reference as I need for a piece, materials, poses, mood, and other artists that embody the style and level of execution I am striving for.  I always start with a drawing, digital or otherwise.

Sometimes its tight, most often very loose, but drawing with paint tends to be the process I ultimately resort to. I’ll draw over the original rough multiple times to refine it, and when working digitally, paint underneath the drawings until it’s time to bring everything in the piece together.


(Timothy by @big_friday)

Then it’s building the forms over and over, mostly monochromatic, glazing color over that, then back into the piece with color and light as needed.  Working with a limited palette of two to three colors for the majority of the process has been my primary way of resolving a piece, as I find I am better able to better understand forms as they relate to light. I find proportions by drawing shapes of light and shadow first, then check for technical accuracy.

My latest approach has been to do ink drawings with pen or brush, scan them, and paint digitally. It’s satisfying and caters to my frequent desire to complete a piece quickly.


(Hell Boy by @big_friday)

TMM:
Will can you talk about any creative influences that you feel transpire in the work that you do?

WC:
I really love classic artists like #Rembrandt and #Caravaggio, #Durer and #Dore, as well as comics from the #GoldenAge to 90’s alternative stuff.  Various aspects of these find their way into everything I do.


(Moebius Monster by @big_friday)

TMM:
Beautiful. So Will, we’re curious about your take on #graffitiandstreetart as a form of expression and creativity? Have you ever personally experienced this on your own creatively or otherwise?

WC:
I have never done any street art, but I think it’s amazing what artists can pull off. The variations of scale, style and location are fascinating to me, and I think it all has a place.  It gives a loud voice for artists and thinkers to expressive themselves.

Getting in people’s faces on a daily basis is important to promote socially conscious ideas and critiques, to influence everyone’s perspective in healthy ways. It’s also important to add “color” to otherwise lackluster environments.

Cities would be drab dwellings without street art - though I do think there is a distinction between art with intention and random tags the violate people’s personal property.


(Pigman by @big_friday)

TMM:
Right, and understood. So in your process of creating the work that you do, is there anyone that you love that your art is created for?

WC:
Anyone finding my art entertaining or inspiring is a huge payoff for me. It’s easy to get critical and stay in my head, forgetting that making art with love transpires that energy to everyone who sees it.

I really enjoy making art for people I am close to who are not artists. Normally making a logo or random design for Joe Average would be demoralizing, but for someone meaningful to me there is an emotional investment knowing that this will be extremely useful for them, and hopefully make them look good. When it works, that’s the best.

TMM:
Will, can you name some artists that you follow or are a very big fan of their work?

WC:
I’ve been really inspired by tattooers a lot lately, like #JeffRassier, #SteveByrne and #JamesBuie. They do a lot of off-kilter, trippy designs in a traditional style that never ceases to entertain and inspire me.  Most of all, with good tattooers in general, the level drawing skill and output is endlessly humbling and aspirational.

I also really love seeing any artist that keeps obsessive sketchbooks. Sketchbooks are the true window to the soul and I have always had a craving to amass as much work in my sketchbooks as I possibly could (a dream that frequently starts hot and dies a slow death), so any artist that is prolific with their sketchbooks gets my motor running.


(Joe Louis by @big_friday)

TMM:
If there were any artist dead or alive today that you could paint, illustrate, and maybe visually create with who would it be?

WC:
I used to idolize #FrankFrazetta, so being able to create with him or pick his brain would cool. #JackKirby would be wonderful to meet and work with. The amount of creative output that guy gave was incredible. He and #WillEisner, they were so influential. #Monsters. Seeing how those guys worked, listening to their stories and understanding their thought processes would be amazing.

TMM:
Awesome, we’ll definitely have to check all these amazing artists out!

So Will, what are you listening to or really into right now? Anyone spectacular that you think we should check out?


(Anna by @big_friday)

WC: 
The new #‪LeonBridges‬ songs are really good and I’m excited for his new album. The new album from #RiversOfNihil is amazing all the way through. I tend to listen to different channels based on mood and conditions. I like the #CryoChamber Youtube for dark ambient stuff, #GimmeRadio for metal and punk, #40sJunction on Sirius while I’m driving, then a mix of things like #‪JamesBrown‬ and #Nails when I’m working out.

TMM:
Rad!

So Will if there were any musician dead or alive that you could work with today who would it be and why?

WC: 
I was a huge fan of #‪TypeONegative‬ growing up and always fantasized about working them somehow and meeting #‪PeterSteele‬. Jamming with #‪RayCharles‬ would be a wrap on life.

TMM:
That would be epic for sure!

So Will, what major project are you working on right now that you’d like to let folks know about?

WC:
I am working full-time on really fun stuff for #DisneyInteractive #Lucasfilm Games, my day job. I occasionally get to do designs for well know bands like #Ghost, which my inner fanboy does giddy dances.

TMM:
Hahaha we'd love to see that giddy dance sometime!
By the way how did you come up with the name @big_friday for your IG handle?

WC:
So I got Big Friday from my friend Adam at a company party years ago. I was trying to convince him to get another drink, he said he was taking it slow because it was only Friday, I clumsily said "well it's Big Friday", and it stuck. Not too dramatic. And I don't drink anymore, haha.

TMM:
Right on!


(Uncle Creepy by @big_friday)

---


You can learn more about Will's work by visiting his
site. You can also follow him on his IG. If you are interested in future projects that The Method Makers and Will will be working on together, be sure to sign up for our mailing list or following The Method Makers on IG.


It's Ooh - We Thought You Knew? March 31 2018, 0 Comments

Super juiced to share this next artist interview.

We’ve been following Udon’s work for the last few years now. As one of the founding members and creators for @oit_taipei we got an exclusive with him about his roots, the inspiration behind all the creative work he does in the streets, his music and with the brand. Yeeeee!


(@its_ooh & we thought you knew)

TMM:
Yo Don, we’ve been following your work for some time now. Really diggin' all that you are doing creatively. How long you been writing Udon & where did the name originate from?

OOH:
I got the name "WU" from my ancestors on the China/Mongolia side of my family. I added the "DON" part cause I went to De Anza high school where the mascot was a Don. I guess also cause I'd rather be a Don than a King...

I was sitting in English class ‪around 2:00pm‬ in the afternoon trying to figure out a name... I don't have any connection to the noodle, but it has helped me connect to my Japanese culture. I started writing Udon in 2000 but was spraying here and there since the 3rd grade.



(The Ghost by Udon)

TMM:
So what's the deal with the character that you write with black eyes and a hood?

OOH:
Ghostface...Thats the spirit bruh...
"The ghost of graffiti " ... I basically am biting Twist since that is the era that really got me.. and that generation made characters an essential part of the game...if not.. at least tolerated.

Sometimes I felt it was a self portrait of me lurking...
other times I felt as though I worked for him and he was/is from another dimension and I had to paint him in this realm for whatever reason.
*hits blunt*


(TAIBAY courtesy @OIT_Taipei)

TMM:
Yo Ooh, when last we heard you’ve split lot time between the Bay and Taiwan. Are you a native of the Bay - or where are you from exactly?

Do you stay in Taiwan mostly and how did you end up taking residence there? .

OOH:
Born in the Bay.. but I have been hybridised since a lil kid always visiting Asia in the summers usually.

I moved to the Philippines when I was 13 for a 3 years. Moved back to the Bay for a while and I left for Asia around the time Bush stole the election. Then I remember seeing Obama win the election and I was like.. Oh man America...

I came to Taiwan not knowing if I would stay but I just couldn't see myself subscribing back into the system that is America.


Where am I from exactly? I'm still searching for that answer but for now the word "Baysia" will suffice.


(OIT Eggshell Slap, courtesy @Oit_Taipei)


(@Oit_Taipei courtesy @Oit_Taipei)

TMM:
Word up! Traveling man we dig it. With regards to Taipei, we’ve been checking the creative work you’ve been doing for OIT. Are you the main creator for this movement, or are there others involved that are puttin in work?

OOH:
OIT is a Tribe.. A collective.  I do my part doing some creative/design work and also keeping our Taipei location in motion but am not the main creator.

At the moment NOE, @onetwoclu  @fundelight  @tpooc are very active in projects but the list of names goes deep. Shout out to everyone who does their part to keep OIT and the tradition alive.


(@Oit_Taipei courtesy @Oit_Taipei)


(@Oit_Taipei courtesy @Oit_Taipei)

TMM:
Yo Ooh can you breakdown the history and inspiration behind OIT?

OOH:
OIT originally stood for "Only In Taiwan". Used to express how amazed we were as Cali kids in Taiwan getting away with what you wouldn't in the Bay. Around 2009, SAYM and FAST were drinking beers in a 7-11 in Taichung and xerox copying photos to make the first OIT zine. After that, NOE made a OIT zine with lots of gems. We were just focused on painting and photos at that time. No idea of ever making clothing.

A year or so later, HOWA and some of the homies printed some OIT logo T-shirts and slowly it bubbled into where we are now. Having a team full of writer/biker/skater/lurker kids we had the city grilled with stickers and paint so we got alot of free advertisement.

OIT at this point in time is both local Taiwan culture and a mixture and blend of the outside culture that comes and adds to the flavor.


(#OnlyInTaiwan courtesy @Oit_Taipei)

TMM:
Word!

So Ooh, you’ve been involved with music, for sometime right? One of our NBK homies RUOK @w3tpaint was talking to us about how he picked up one of your mixed tapes a while back. Can you describe how the music you are mixing/producing/listening to influences the work that you do?

OOH:
I would say the one main direct effect music can have on my graffiti is hitting up lil quotes next to tags.

But I suppose a certain song I might have on repeat might make me feel a certain color vibration and I will want to use that color to paint with.

1. In the street - good mobb music for driving around at night to smack spots and make me feel all ninja.

2. On the OIT Label - as far as when trying to do creative work for OIT.. I just try to listen to whatever fits the vibe im in. I usually take walks and listen music and take visual queues from the streets and snap shots for reference.

TMM:
That’s dope. We can see how music can have a big impact on you depending on what you are doing creatively at the time - we can dig it.


(Udon by @Its_Ooh)

TMM:
Yo OOH, what are some of the major projects that you are working on creatively right now and the rest of ‘18?

OOH:
Mainly, I'm just trying to get these passport stamps and dump these streakers, stickers and cans of paint. I'm trying to wrap up the Udon world tour by 2020. Other than that, more mixtapes and possibly some type of production?! I wanna record a mix of songs to give to people at my funeral service too.

*hits blunt*

I'm also helping Optimist and Stuey with their UCIT video project which is coming along well and hopefully we can get some type of backing to do more episodes in different countries.

Other than that, I'm currently working on building up a new location for OIT in Taipei as well as doing more pop up events around the island of Taiwan, Asia and even in California.

Oh and I just decided that I am gonna work with @e40 at some point soon. Can't speak on details but it will happen.

TMM:
Sick! Looking forward to hearing and seeing more of this as it develops.

Can you share some of your goals creatively for the art you produce in the streets, and/or for galleries?

OOH:
For the streets, to get those super dummy cutty tuck spot tags that when seen fools will be like "bruh!?"

Also, to do it all from shitty fill ins to colorful bangers to huge rollers preferably on a rooftop up high or close to airplane landing zones so fools flying into a country see it as they descend on to the tarmac.

I don't have much aspiration to be in galleries but I am not 100% against it. If I did do anything gallery wise, it would be something to do with the Ghostface character or just centered around photography I have been working on lately.


(Often In Transit courtesy @Oit_Taipei)

TMM:
Yo Ooh, what about OIT? What are some of the goals you hope to achieve with the movement?

OOH:
Although, there is always more to achieve, I do feel happy about where we are and what we have accomplished. Seeing people from Japan, Australia, USA, Europe, Vietnam, Philippines, Hong Kong etc. come to the shop keeps me pumped.

But one thing other than making more dope gear, would be to start bringing both musical and visual talent to Asia and doing shows and parties out here. I feel that both sides need it. Some DJ or painter from the Bay would probably benefit from coming out here and the local youth and scene here needs to be exposed to the culture in real life, not just thru the internet.

TMM:
Word, travel and culture exposure is good for the soul.


(YE'OL, Udon, OptimiStuey, Metro Manila, Philippines Courtesy Is Tap)

TMM:
So can you tell us about your crew THE MD's.

OOH:
The MD's was founded by YE'OL and myself in the early 2000's around the time grape Swishers and Hyphy Juice were poppin.

I had met YE'OL in passing several times at Hip Hop in the Park in Berkeley but we never linked. When I moved to Oakland, I noticed his cutty hands around the area I lived and figured he might live around also. When we finally linked thru other hip hop functions I realized he was repping YMD and I was repping BMD which was a lil fake crew me and my older brother made in like 1994-95.

Finding out me and YE'OL were basically on the same vision and mode we decided to drop the Y and the B and just rep THE MD's since there weren't many crews with that kind of name.

We have Many Definitions for the MD's but here are a few : #MyDogs #MaineyDreams #MobileDispensary #MarijuanaDoctors #MakingDollars #MultiDimensional #MostlyDirty #MobbingDolo #ManagingDistricts #ManilaDecorators #MayorDellums #MikeDream #‪MacDre‬

‪TMM:‬
‪Yeeeeeee!‬


(Udon Roller by @Its_Ooh)


TMM:
Yo Ooh, top 5 hip hop songs that you feel everyone should search for that you feel are underrated, underground or otherwise?

OOH:
Stunny - Run that shit back
Green Team - Go Dumb USA (intro song) (this song should replace e40 tell me when to go as the main hyphy anthem)
@E40 - three jobs
Messy Marv & San Quinn - Smile
L-Deez - Going up (only on sound cloud)

I could go on and on .. but there you go.

Can I just include one song I hope to never hear in a party setting again...
Jay-z and Alicia Keys - New York ... please never play that

No diss to those artists.. I fux with them but that one song.. please spare me.

TMM:
Haha word that shit gets waaaaay too much play. I think we can all agree we good for the next 10 - 20 years.


(Udon Roller by @Its_Ooh)

TMM:
Yo Don tell us a joke.

OOH:
Donald Trump is the president of the United states.

Hella people still think 9-11 was caused by middle eastern terrorists.

TMM:
Got emmmm... Ok, ok, so nowww ask us any question. What have you been dying to ask? Anything you want. Go!

OOH:
How do you feel when you hear a record like ‪2pac‬'s new one?

TMM:
Hahaha 🔥🔥🔥

OOH:
Would u rather eat noodles or rice for the rest of your life?

TMM:
Noodles all day boyyyy. Long life on birthdays for all the Pinoys - shout out to moms!

OOH:
What do you think would happen if all different ethnicities left America to return to their home country and brought all their money and resources with them?

TMM:
A small population of Native American tribes that still own Casinos would continue to prosper and all the writers would go buck on all the govt. buildings.

Aight anyone out there you wanna shout out before we rap?

OOH:
@wontywon @strait.toy @gravoringo @enjoy_one1 @nastynush
@later_est.2013 @henkaone @220_220 @dynomiteemcee

TMM:
Word we got em! Peace & Love homie! Bless Up!


(TMM Blackbook - Handstyles by Udon)
---

Mad love to the Don for taking the time to connect with us!


(Ghost by Udon)

-TMM


Never Say Nevr March 29 2018, 0 Comments


(Live from Laguna, Philippines; Walls By
@nevr_lgs #NoseBleedKrew)

We're pretty stoked to present the next artist that we’ve had the opportunity to connect with.

We’ve been following the work of Nevs for the last few years since @basiclee inducted the homie into NBK.

Let’s get into the interview...

TMM:

Ok Nevs, where you from in the Philippines?

Nevs:

Right now, I’m currently living both in Santa Rosa City, and Marikina City, Philippines


(Walls By @nevr_lgs #NoseBleedKrew)

TMM:
And so tell us how you got the name Never/Nevr/Nevs?

Nevs:
I got it from a magazine article of a writer that used to write Never, so since he's writing a new tag so I thought I use it. Then took the 2nd E out cause I'm lazy to do 5 letters, so Nevr. Then facebook won't approve of that name so they recommend Nevs. But the name is also for all my frustrations in life all the "Never" things in my life. So yeah that's it.


(Walls By @nevr_lgs #NoseBleedKrew @quiccs #PilipinasStreetPlan)


(Walls By @nevr_lgs #NoseBleedKrew @quiccs #PilipinasStreetPlan with
love from Pasig, Metro Manila, Philippines.)



(
#NoseBleedKrew by @nevr_lgs #KillTV @basiclee with paint from Marikina, Philippines.)


TMM:
Yo Nevs, from our understanding you get down a lot and are super busy. From following your work these last couple of years it seems like you rep a bunch of different crews. Can you name them all?

Nevs:
I do rep a lot of crews. Let’s see there’s GAK, ECDK, NBK, TFK, PSP & LGS..


(#ThreeFlareKrew By @nevr_lgs)


(
Walls by @nevr_lgs #LagunaGraffSquad)


(
Walls by @nevr_lgs #LagunaGraffSquad)

TMM:
Damn that’s crazy! What do they all mean brooo?

Nevs:
Yeah - Guerrilla Aerosol Kru, East Coast Dead Kids, Nose Bleed Krew, Three Flare Krew, Pilipinas Street Plan & Laguna Graff Squad.


(Wall Art by
@distortmonsters @nevr_lgs #NoseBleedKrew Parañaque City,
Metro Manila, Philippines)

 

TMM:
Dope. So is there any message message your trying to convey with the work you do within each of the different crews?

Nevs:

I'd say for the LGS, it's all Laguna based writers.

PSP, is like a collective, that each member has been focusing on their own. But the main focus still is being the street art. Promoting the sub-culture/culture for the mass.


(Walls By @nevr_lgs #NoseBleedKrew @quiccs
& various writers from #PilipinasStreetPlan)


(Wall Art by
@nevr_lgs #NoseBleedKrew in Sta. Rosa City, Laguna,
Philippines.)


TMM:
Rad. But what about the work you do on the street? Like graffiti for instance?

Nevs:
Well I feel that doing graffiti is political itself.

As for the crews I rep, there are no political agenda/causes, but maybe some. Just awareness of what's happening I guess.

TMM:

Word up Nevs, we can dig it. So what projects are you working on currently?


(Assorted Bando Signage Exhibited by
@nevr_lgs #NoseBleedKrew Laguna, Philippines.)

Nevs:

Current work now at Ronac Lifestyle Center in Magallanes for the Manila Takeover exhibit alongside many talented artists.

TMM:
Dope brotha, much love for taking the time to connect with us. Also appreciate the time given our 15+ hour time difference. Much love and regards to the fam back home!

Nevs:
Peace!


---

You can follow more of Nev’s work
here by hitting the follow button on your instagram app, or signing up for our mailing list here, or following The Method Makers on Instagram. Yeeeeeee!

Memphis Manifest - Hosted By Bora Da Explorer March 27 2018, 0 Comments


(FGE, Solid Clod, Courtesy @Boaradaexplorer)

In less than 2 weeks our Tennessee brother @boradaexplorer will be curating and hosting one of the sickest custom freight train exhibits to ever take place.We caught up with him recently to find out more.


(Personal Collection, Image Courtesy @Boaradaexplorer)

TMM:
Bora you’ve been taking flicks and exploring for many years. Tell us about how this show relates to your work as a photographer and an artist.”


(Personal Collection, Image Courtesy @Boaradaexplorer)

Bora:
Memphis Manifest is a  H O scale & freight graffiti exhibition. It is a look at my personal collection of hand painted model trains and art I've accumulated through my seven years of traveling and photographing freight and graffiti throughout the country.


(Personal Collection, Image Courtesy @Boaradaexplorer)


It will feature over 400 hand painted trains, along with select freight and graffiti photos shot by me. There will be a 6'x3' detailed track display running. The show will also include artists canvases, a sticker exchange table, black booking, & hard copy photo trading.


(Personal Collection, Image Courtesy @Boaradaexplorer)

TMM:
Whoa 400 trains from individual writers! That’s crazy! How did you end up choosing the location for the show?


(Anemal, CBS Crew, @Boaradaexplorer)

Bora:
I choose the city of Memphis because it is a city built around the railroad. With CN BNSF UP CSX & NS running through it. It is a great central hub for freight from around the country.


(Paser, MFK, Courtesy @Boaradaexplorer)

TMM:
In terms of Memphis and it’s art community, tell us about how the show comes together to bridge the gap between street art/graffiti and the city of Memphis.


(Personal Collection, Image Courtesy @Boaradaexplorer)


Bora:
The city is full of color and the local writers take pride in their graffiti history. I'm excited to bring my collection to Memphis and hope to see y'all at the show.


(Toby, 42 Crew, Courtesy @Boaradaexplorer)

TMM:
We’ll do our best, thank you brotha!


(Image Courtesy @Boaradaexplorer)

Bora:

Likewise, thank you.
---

Crosstown Arts Gallery ‪
1350 Concourse Ave ‬
Memphis, TN, USA
$5 Admission

The Art Of Ryan Barry - @9Monkeys March 24 2018, 0 Comments


(Space Station by @9monkeys)

Recently we asked our community of followers to hit us up with the names of artists that they thought we should know about.


Thanks specifically to @aplaceofsalt - ❤️❤️❤️ we found out about @9monkeys. Giving back we thought we’d share some of his work here.



We caught up with @9monkeys a few weeks ago to pick his brain about his work - Peep!

TMM:
So where are you from Ryan?



9M:
I'm from Berkeley California.

TMM:
Random question; what’s your favorite color?



9M:
I don't really have a favorite color but I really like high contrast, really dark, with really light. WATCH BLADERUNNER 2049!



TMM:
Nice, we'll have to check it out! Wifey is a big fan of Ryan Gosling's work (and face) haha.

Btw, what are you listening to right now - what’s on heavy rotation on your streaming music set?



9M:
I try to listen to everything because music has a strong impact on me. I'm always listening to metal music though, Finsterforst, Equilibrium, Finntroll, and so on. But recently I've been really into the Kill Bill soundtrack. The track from the final fight in Volume 1 epic.



(@Elujay Album Cover Art by @9monkeys)

TMM:
So where do you get your inspiration from in the work you create?

9M:
Always listening to music, I create scenes in my head depending on the song.  Movies too of course, AKIRA being up there, anything from Hayao Miyasaki and most recently the amazing BLADERUNNER 2049.  Other artists, manly European and Asian, Eastern Art are my favorite.


(Album Cover Art for @illzeewill and @kamcooks by @9monkeys)

TMM:
This robot poster is so fucking dope! Was this part of a project you did for someone/commission?

9M:
The robot painting is a poster I did for artists, @illzeewill and @kamcooks. They are big fans of Japanese art and anime and were working together on a collaboration album inspired by those things. 

They wanted to be drawn as pilots of Mechs, and I thought it would be really cool if it was like a Pacific Rim thing where the two of them Pilot the Mech together. I thought it was a cool representation of their collaboration!!

TMM:
Dude so sick! It most definitely was!!


(Comic Experiment Illustration Work by @9monkeys)

TMM:
So tell us about this illustration.

9M:
This is just an experiment. I'm trying to get into drawing comics and telling stories. This page was just a quick sketch of some panels. I had a lot of fun inking!

TMM:
By the way where did the user name @9Monkeys come from?

9M:
Haha there's really nothing behind it. I spent like hours trying to figure out a way for my name work in a user name that I liked and I couldn’t get one they had all been taken. I wanted something unique but nothing was working, and for whatever reason it popped in my head.

My younger sister was a softball team called the 5 little monkeys, sponsored by a local toy store, "The 5 Little Monkeys". 9 has always been a cool number to me, such a clean sounding name Nine - 9monkeys just came out. I tested it, and it worked and I was like fuck it.

I've been asked a lot about where the name came from, I wish it had a cooler origin haha!


TMM:
Haha that’s awesome! We do really dig the name, your work, and think that the story fits well!

---

Special thanks to Ryan for diving deep with us. You can follow more of his work on his IG page and sign up to our mailing list directly to hear more about future collaborations that we may have in the works with him.

We've asked him to take part in our on-going Artist Sketchbook Project. You can follow the project on our site & via the Artist Sketchbook Project's IG account.

Much love!
-TMM


#PaulEscolarIsDrunk March 22 2018, 0 Comments


(#MethodMakers by Paul Escolar)

We're super stoked to publish our first interview of 2018!

We were introduced to Paul from a good friend I’ve known for over 20 years @babymuah - in fact this is an image of him - sorry bro but this image was too good not to share!

Let’s begin...


(Chons)

TMM:
What inspired this piece you drew of Tsyonsyn - shits fucking hilarious!

PE:
It was his birthday, I missed the party and I wanted to let him know that i'm not an asshole, so I drew him into the most offensive caricature ever, oopsies! Accurate tho, no? hahaha.

TMM:
Too too good! OK tell us about yourself & how you know Tsyonsyn?

PE:

Name is Paul Escolar, from Alameda. I know Chons from the old party days in the 2000's when he was doing "The Fcks" DJ Gigs in San Hoe w/ Cellus. They all thought they were going to be the next Trap Daft Punk, and I believed it too - Still do. Good times, good times...


(Broken Promises)

TMM:

We googled you and you are really fucking good at yo-yoing - do you still do that? How’d you get into that and where can I see that live?
 

PE:

I am currently "retired" from that scene, but I was sponsored and worked for Duncan Toys for over 15 years, now I just do occasional contracted design work for them. I'm also known for creating most of the standard and fundamental modern yo-yo tricks kids do today. I also demonstrated, and judged contests all over and ran one of the most prestigious events in the country for the last few years out at Golden Gate park. Believe it or not the Pre/Post Parties I through for that community were lit af.  I got into yo-yos since I was a kid - been throwing for 20 years. I don't film or play yo-yo in public these days, but if you want a private lesson, come holla at me, haha. Also dead serious about all of this and I can go on and on about yo-yo's, but its lightweight square shit, even to me, so lets just talk about art!

 


(How Can I Save You.)

TMM:
Word up! Btw, we're really impressed with your illustration work. How long have you been drawing, and how did you develop the style of work that you create?

 

PE:

I appreciate the compliment and It's/I'M totally still a work in progress, still learning and experimenting a bit every day. I've been drawing since I was a Kid, I went to the Academy of Art for Art Direction in Advertising but at the end of all that I just ended up wanting to illustrate, do graphics, and work on personal art. Still not sure where I'm going with it but stoked to see where it takes me. So far the waves have been amazing.


TMM:

Do you do any work in the street (Tag, Throws, scribe etc)

 

PE:

Unfortunately, I have never done any work in the street. It seemed intimidating to me back then, but I always paid attention and have mad respect for anyone who gets up everywhere. I slap stickers around sometimes, but I've always been low key discouraged since there's such talented community of Artists that already exist in that world. I just enjoy being a spectator and fan, but I'm open to mural work at this point in my life. Holla for any plug on commissions and ill throw in a yo-yo lesson, lol.  Also, side note - I'm too lazy to be carrying around markers, and cans and shit.

 


(Illustration Session)

TMM:

How would you describe your style of work?

 

PE:

Hmmm, Alot of the shit I share is very personal and emotional... at least conceptually. But from an aesthetic stand point maybe its considered "Low Brow Graphic Illustrations"?, I'm not sure about labels. Under the visual surface of it all; it is very social, emotional and self narrative. I try to tell what's going on in my mind or what I'm going through in my life with one image that hopefully tells the whole story.

 

TMM:

Are there any major influences in the artwork that you create?

 

PE:

I find inspiration and influence in everything; Music, movies, fashion, etc. As Far as art, there are way too many to name. My favorite modern artist of all time is Matisse, but I've taken alot of my inspiration and influence from Barry Mcgee, R.Crumb, ESPO, Mike Giant, The Hernandez Brothers, Geoff Mcfetridge, and Others.... maybe it's visible in my aesthetic?

 

(Rose)

TMM:

Where do you create most of your work? How do you draw inspiration from where you create?

 

PE:

I work from home, in private, in solitude... I zone out and zen the fuck out. Most of my illustrations are part of a very meditative and cathartic process, I keep those sessions pretty low-key but sometimes I have my sketchbooks and computer when i'm at a coffee shop or chill bar, and I'll just get it out. The times I'm out of my batcave, wandering or partying, I'm just keeping tabs, taking mental notes of things I see, taking actual notes for ideas, and staying inspired by everything and anything. The end result is some* of the work I share on Instagram, but most of the time I just be hoarding alot of it to myself.

 

TMM: 
Tell us a joke.

 

PE:

I was just actually about to google "What's a funny joke?", haha. fuck it.

 

TMM:
Haha word up good shit lol! Ok ask us 1 question that you’ve been burning to know about us.

PE:

If Method Makers was a a 4th Gen iPod (The one with just the scroll wheel) what would be the 5 top played songs in the iTunes playlist? Also, "What's your poison?"

 

TMM:
Dayyymn 4th Gen iPod ok ok - 5 songs (from 4th gen iPod days and what WE was likely into at that specific period of time)

1. The Manifesto - Talib Kweli
2. The What - Big & Meth Tical
3. Negro Baseball League - Jean Grae
4. Amber - 311
5. People Of The Sun - RATM


Aight so moving on lol - w
ould you be open to do collaborative projects with us? Art shows, Prints, apparel production, air guitar band?

 

PE:

ALWAYS! I fuck with everybody making whatever, whenevers. As long as I keep moving, and making shit, I'm happy. Prints, Shirts, Shows - sure. Air Guitar Band? - Fuck it, ...I'll play bass. let's sesh!

 

Right on for reaching out to me Neal and The Method Makers, really excited on joining the band. I really appreciate it everything!


TMM:
Mad love Paul! Looking forward to a future collab at some point!

(Work below - Broken, Empty)


Cheers,
#TheMethodMakers